My Passover Journey

As a minister I find it essential to walk my talk so to speak. So I am goin to post here my 8-day Passover Journey through the various TASKS I put out for you.

TASK1

Watch the extract from ‘The Prince of Egypt’  below. Then, I would like to invite you to give the story a new meaning by adapting it to your life and circumstances.
  • What is it that has enslaved you so far and you want to become free from?
  • How are you going to part the ‘red sea’ of you fears (or what enslaves you)?
  • How are you going to call upon the Divine to support you to become free?
  • What are you going to do during the next 8 days to support yourself to get free?

My answers

I see the parting sea as God’s Grace..

Ask, and it shall be given you; seek, and ye shall find; knock, and it shall be opened unto you: For every one that asketh receiveth; and he that seeketh findeth; and to him that knocketh it shall be opened.

I ask to be released and I am given. But I must be persistent and humble in my asking. I am also protected from my own fears and demons who appear like the pharaoh’s army always chasing me and ragging me back down. But as long as I focus, I meditate and I pray I am led out of my own misery. 

  • What is it that has enslaved you so far and you want to become free from?

A sense of unexplainable guilt and obligation. I often feel that there is a sense of obligation behind my altruistic actions. I would like to serve freely or not serve at all.

  • How are you going to part the ‘red sea’ of you fears (or what enslaves you)?

My fear is that I would be punished if I do not meet my obligations. I often assume more obligations that is truly mine and I still fear punishment. I will consciously keep on stepping back and wait to be called upon instead of stepping in assuming obligation.

  • How are you going to call upon the Divine to support you to become free?

I have spent some time in meditation today consciously releasing my sense of guilt and obligations back to the nothingness asking God to lift me higher so I can become free of them.

  • What are you going to do during the next 8 days to support yourself to get free?

I will keep on meditating and praying for forgiveness and release, and will keep on stepping back releasing the assumption that it is all my duty. 

Different Activities for Passover

Passover is a week-long (8 days) reminder of hard-earnt freedom. We are asked to contemplate on the meaning of FREEDOM for us. When do you feel FREE? What makes you feel FREE? This week can be an opportunity to contemplate how you can support yourself to be freer in who you are as a unique expression of the Divine. 

Below is a list of various activities that people do during the week of Passover. As mentioned before, the first two night (evenings) are spend with contemplating on the ‘passing over the red sea’, a parable from the Old Testament in the Bible. Yesterday, I invited you to contemplate on the metaphysical meaning of the story and answer questions around the meaning of ‘freedom’ for you.

Today, I want to invite you to chose a ‘task’ for each day of Passover from the list below. I would like to encourage you to bring an element of the spiritual to each of the task you do by which you can support yourself to move into greater freedom in yourself.

Cleaning

During Passover Jews refrain from eating chametz, food with leavening such as bread, cookies, or pasta. Before Passover begins, families will clean their homes to clear out the chametz. (Jews refer to leavened items, which must be discarded from the home before Passover, by the Hebrew term “chametz” (pronounced “HA-metz” and also spelled “chometz.”) It includes anything made with grains like wheat, oats, rye barley and spelt.)

Clean your house off  leavened items can be seen as cleaning our consciousness of ‘thoughts’ that fester. What thoughts and emotions do you allow to fester in your consciousness that causes you fear or harm? Is there something you often worry about? Eliminate these thoughts by giving them up to God (the Divine), consciously releasing them by affirming that

“I release you into the nothingness where you came from! I stop worrying about … now.  I am grateful for your service but now I am OK without you! I love you and release you. I am at peace knowing that I am centered in the Care of the Divine Presence.”  

Eating Matzah

During Passover, you’ll probably eat matzah, a cracker-like bread substitute representing the bread that didn’t have time to rise when the Jews fled Egypt. Learn to make your own matzah (CLICK).

How about making some plain food over the week? How about not indulging in heavy dishes and just keeping your food simple and basic. We often eat process food that are full of chemicals because they go through a complicated laboratory-like system before it gets on your table. Make your own food this week. Bless your food this week. There were times when food was scarce and every bite was a grace-filled blessing of nourishment. Make eating your food a spiritual event 🙂 during Passover and see what happens. 

“I bless with food so it can nourish my body and keep it healthy and strong. I release all condemning thoughts that I harbour about my body’s imperfections. I love my body with this food.”

The Seder

The seder, held on the first one or two nights of the holiday, consists of a festive meal, the retelling of the Exodus story, and several other rituals and traditions, like finding the afikomen (a piece of matzah hidden during the ceremony), singing songs like “Dayenu,” and opening the door symbolically for the prophet Elijah. 

Provocative questions on relevant topics to help bring your Seder to life.

The Haggadah tells us to adapt our Seder to the various attitudes of the people we find present around the table. The “wise son” receives wisdom, the “evil son” receives sharp confrontation, the “simple son” is taught the ABC’s of Judaism, and the “one who doesn’t know how to ask” is engaged in dialogue that will open him up.

Questions that provoke discussion about relevant topics can help bring your Seder to life. Here are some questions for your Seder table that you can pose yourself or discuss with others over the week. 

  1. When dipping the Karpas into salt water: Has anything ever happened to you which seemed bitter at the time but later turned out to be sweet?

  2. When breaking the middle matzah and hiding it for later: What is a “hidden” aspiration that you have, i.e. something that you have postponed for later in life but you plan/aspire to one day get to?

  3. When speaking about how the Jewish people were sent down to Egypt: How have the hardships in your life helped you become a more compassionate person?

  4. When speaking about the harsh slavery: In our day-to-day lives, do we really love what we do or are we more like slaves to our work or lifestyle?

  5. The word Mitzrayim (Egypt) resembles the Hebrew word for constriction. What is your personal Mitzrayim? What is holding you back the most?

  6. When speaking about the plagues: Are there signs in our life pushing us to change that we are just refusing to see?

  7. Are there signs around us that God exists? What are they?

  8. If you knew for certain that God would help you succeed, even through miracles, what new endeavor would you take on?

  9. When speaking about jumping in the Red Sea: What have you done recently that defied your fears and you stepped out of your comfort zone?

  10. When singing Dayneu: What are the gifts in our life that make it all worth it?

  11. When reciting Hallel: If you could fully express gratitude to someone in your past who really made a difference in your life, who would it be?

  12. When eating matzah: If you could eradicate laziness from your life and live with complete discipline, what could you accomplish?

source

The Haggadah

During the seder, families will read from the Haggadah to tell the story of Passover and pass down the traditions and lessons of the story to their children, relatives, and friends. In Hebrew, Haggadah means “telling.” This book is basically a guide for the seder and includes prayers, blessings, songs, and information for how the seder should be performed. Families everywhere add their own personal touches to make the script of the Haggadah their own.

MAKE YOUR OWN HAGGADAH

What is a Haggadah?

The word haggadah comes from the same root as “to tell” in Hebrew. The haggadah is meant as a guide to the entire Seder. A good one will serve as a follow-along reader for you and your guests, taking them through each step with instructions, explanations, talking points, ideas for further reflection, and, of course, all of the texts you will be reading, singing, or discussing. 

Why should I make my own haggadah?

As you can see from the above, there is nothing at all unusual about authoring custom-made haggadot. The whole objective of the Seder both as a didactic and an experiential endeavor is to get people to participate, ask questions, formulate opinions, and generally interact with the Seder experience. Another wonderful aspect of making your own haggadah is that the copies you use at the Seder can double as Passover gifts for your guests to take with them as both a memory of the special time you will have spent together, as well as for future use for years to come. 

RESOURCES AND IDEAS LINK

If you are not Jewish, you can create the Haggadah around any themes that are meaningful to you. The main message of Passover is ‘Freedom from Slavery’. You can choose any story around this message from the Bible or any other source that inspires you and make a Haggadah.

Haggadah is a booklet that you make yourself using pictures, text, colouring, writing, painting. Haggadah can be seen as a reminder of the Passover story as you interpret it. (you can chose another story, if you like). The questions above can guide you and you are invited to contemplate on the meaning of ‘freedom’ for you as you create your own Haggadah. 

Opening the Door for Elijah

On each table there is a goblet of wine called “Elijah’s Cup.” During the meal someone will open the door to welcome the prophet Elijah, exemplifying the line from the Haggadah “Let all who are hungry, come and eat.”

Every Passover, Jews set an extra cup of wine on the dinner table and open the door for the enigmatic prophet Elijah, hoping he will enter. An evolving symbol of hope and redemption in Judaism over the centuries, Elijah’s return is said to mark the Messiah’s earthly arrival.

What does the Bible tell us about Elijah?

He first appears as a zealous prophet for God. There’s something wild and primeval about him. He’s totally committed to monotheism. [Elijah’s name means “Yahweh is my God” in Hebrew.]

In that period, [9th century BCE], a good number of the Israelites were wavering in their faith. King Ahab of Israel really wanted to have it both ways, worshiping the Israelite God and [the Canaanite god] Baal.

So Elijah was out to defeat idolatry, but he didn’t entirely succeed. Dejected, he asked God to take his life. He went to Mount Sinai where he had an encounter with God, and God said, “What are you doing here, Elijah?”

In the Book of Kings, Elijah is taken up to heaven in a whirlwind, in a fiery chariot. In the book of Malachi [the final prophetic book in the Bible], it later says Elijah’s going to announce the End of Days. So, the rabbis assume that he’s taken alive to heaven. But, for the rabbis, he’s too extreme. So, he gradually becomes depicted in rabbinical texts as a compassionate hero. He’s still zealous, but now he’s zealous to right wrongs. He’s zealous to help the poor. He can’t stay away from Earth when somebody is in trouble.

source

We all need a version of Elijah at your ‘table’ or in our life. Zeal – dedication and enthusiasm – is a quality we all need in order to  move through life’s challenges.  You are encouraged to invite or, if you already have them, enhance these qualities in your life. What can you do to become more zealous and enthusiastic? What changes do you need to make and where? Apart from being a zealous prophet, Elijah is also a symbol of hope and redemption. In my observation, we all have areas of our life where we can do with more hope. In meditation, invite God/the Divine Presence to fill that area of your life with Hope and Love. Visualize pouring these qualities in and feeling you up. Observe the sensation and ensure that you take these with you all day, every day. 

We become freer by releasing what does not work or what does not serve us any longer.

Singing “Dayenu”

Many families will sing “Dayenu” during their seder. The word dayenu means “it would have been enough.” This joyous tune celebrates the many blessings God bestowed upon the Jewish people during their exodus from Egypt in ancient times.

source

While listening to this fun song, I invite you remind yourself of the wonderful things that are present in your life. Be grateful and celebrate the many blessings that are present and by doing that you will shift your focus from lack to abundance. Focusing into abundance of blessings and goodness frees us from worry about lack and drama. 

Passover

In Unity we chose to celebrate, integrate and welcome people from all faith. Personally, as a minister, I like celebrating along with different traditions because I believe that each spiritual tradition, custom or celebration offer an opportunity for us all to look to the Divine Presence and move into  deeper communion with IT.

From the 22nd to the 29th of April we are celebrating Passover or Pesach. I would like to invite you to walk this 8-day Passover journey with me doing something different each day – see my next post on the possible activities list – that may support your spiritual unfolding and build a deeper sense of awareness of your connectedness to the Divine Presence.

Today, I am going to introduce what Pesach is… (read more below)

Then, I would like to invite you to watch this clip from the animated film called The Prince of Egypt and/or read the passage in the Bible about the freeing of the Jews.
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Then, I would like to invite you to give the story a new meaning by adapting it to your life and circumstances.
  • What is it that has enslaved you so far and you want to become free from?
  • How are you going to part the ‘red sea’ of you fears (or what enslaves you)?
  • How are you going to call upon the Divine to support you to become free?
  • What are you going to do during the next 8 days to support yourself to get free?
 
Tomorrow, I will post a few activities that you can do over the next 8 days to support yourself in your ‘Passover transformation’.

Pesach starting on the Evening Of
Mon, Apr 22, 2024 till Mon, Apr 29, 2024

SHORT INTRODUCTION

Passover falls on the 14th day of the Hebrew month of Nisan (late March or April). Depending on your tradition, you might celebrate Passover for seven days, while others observe the holiday for eight days.

Passover is both agricultural and historical in origin. Also known as Chag haAviv, the “Festival of the Spring,” it reminds us of the early spring harvest in the former land of Canaan, now Israel. Much more commonly recognized for its historical significance, Passover is also known as Zman Cheruteynu, “The Season of Our Freedom.”

The name Passover is symbolic of the Angel of Death “passing over” the Jewish homes while killing the first born of the Egyptians, the last of the Ten Plagues before Pharaoh let the Jews go.

 

What is Pesach?

Pesach, or Passover, is an 8-day Jewish holiday during the Jewish month of Nissan- at the beginning of spring. ‘Pesach’ means to pass over, commemorating the miracle God performed for the Jewish people enslaved in Egypt, where He passed over their homes during the 10th plague that killed the firstborn of every Egyptian home. 

Any chometz (food made of flour and water that was allowed to rise) is removed from the home, and matzah (flat, unleavened bread) is eaten instead. Maror (bitter herbs) is eaten to remember the brutal conditions that the Jews lived in.

The history of Pesach

The celebration of Pesach is based on the story of Exodus, when God saved the Jewish people from the cruel Egyptian rule and ultimately brought them to the Land of Israel. The story begins when the Egyptians enslaved the Jewish people, forcing the women, men, and children to perform back-breaking labor every day. They were vicious and cruel, enacting new laws to make the lives of the Jews increasingly miserable.

The king of Egypt, Pharaoh, even decreed to kill every Jewish male newborn when he had a dream that a Jewish man would redeem the Jews from their bondage. Ironically, his own daughter Princess Batya saved Moses, a Jewish baby floating in the Nile river, and brought him to her father’s palace. 

Batya raised Moses in the palace of his greatest enemy until he ran away. One day, God revealed himself to Moses in a thornbush and sent him as a messenger to Pharaoh, ordering him in the name of G-d to let the Jewish people go. Pharaoh refused, so G-d inflicted the people of Egypt with the first plague- all the water in the land turned to blood for a week. 

Pharoah begged Moses to end the plague, promising to release the Jewish people. But as soon as the plague ended, Pharaoh changed his mind and did not relent. So God brought the second plague – millions of frogs all over Egypt. This repeated itself 10 times, with each plague lasting a week). Here are the ten plagues:  blood, frogs, lice, wild animals, death of the animals, boils, hail, grasshoppers, darkness, and the death of every firstborn.

Pharoah suddenly realized that he was the firstborn of his family and would therefore die imminently. He ran to find Moses in the middle of the night and ordered him to round up all the Jews in Egypt and leave the country immediately. Thus, the Jewish people were released from their decades of cruel slavery and ultimately were appointed as God’s chosen nation at Mount Sinai in the desert.

How is Pesach celebrated?

For the entire 8 days of Pesach, Jews may not own or consume any chometz. This is because when Pharoah urged the Jewish people to leave Egypt, they were in the middle of baking bread. They flung their doughs over their shoulders and hastily walked out of the land.  The bread jostled on their backs as they walked in the hot sun, which didn’t allow them to rise. The dough resulted in matzah, which Jews eat instead of bread during Pesach.

Today, the homes are cleaned extensively to ensure no trace of chometz. Many people use the opportunity of Pesach cleaning to ‘spring clean’ the house simultaneously. There is a special ceremony on the day before Pesach where the final search for chometz takes place, and all remaining foods are burnt.

On the first two nights of Pesach, the family hosts a ‘seder,’ where the Haggadah – the story of the Exodus from Egypt- is read. Several rituals during the seder include eating the maror, eating matzah, drinking four cups of wine or grape juice, and discussing the story in great depth.

 

Ram(a) Navami, day of awareness

In the Kali Yuga, the wars are within us wherein Rama is our Sou, Sita is our Mind, Hanuman is our life force (prana) and Ravan is our ego.

Ravana (Ego) takes over Sita (Mind) which makes Rama (Soul) restless, To harmonize Mind and Soul, one needs to meditate and breath Hanuman in complete awareness. Once the harmony is established, Rama and Sita reunite and ego is destroyed.

 

SPIRITUAL SIGNIFICANCE

Today, as part of Rama Navami Hindu Celebration, we are invited to find and observe the light within and observe its presence though out many senses. We are asked to be present in our experiences throughout the day and observe, how the light that resides within.

At this link CLIK HERE you can read the beautiful story and the spiritual significance of this celebration.

Source

What is Rama Navami?

The rituals and customs associated with Rama Navami vary from region to region throughout India. The day is marked by reciting from the Hindu epic Ramayana which narrates the tale of Rama. Vaishnava Hindus celebrate the festival by visiting temples, praying, fasting, listening to spiritual discourses and singing bhajans or kirtans (devotional songs). Some devotees offer worship to Rama like an infant by placing an image of him in a cradle. Charitable events and community meals are also organized. The festival is an occasion for moral reflection for many Hindus

Source

The celebration runs through the 16th and the 17th of April from about 2pm till 2pm the next day.

Gudi Padwa/Chaitra Sukhladi

The Hindu New Year

It is believed that Lord Brahma, the creator of the universe, created the world on this day. Therefore, this day is considered auspicious and is celebrated as the beginning of a new era.

***

Another day to have fun and celebrate. 🙂 The Hindues celebrate Sukhladi or Gudi Padwa (this celebration has many names) on the 9th of April with gifts and decorations.

Every celebratory event is an opportunity to cheer up and have fun. The world is full of drama and gloom. When I am invited to celebrate, give thanks, be marry and joyous, I take the opportunity.

Let’s celebrate that we are healthy, we live in abundance of opportunities, we are free to make decisions for ourselves, and we are loved (at least by one person, yourself). Let’s make it a day of joy, fun, laughter, even if it is difficult because of circumstances. One laughter is more than none.  One smile is more than none. Remembering of one nice thing is better than none. Making a day count by peeping out of the drama and the craze, will make your day. I guarantee that.

More information on Chaitra Sukhladi

In 2024, the date of Chaitra Sukhladi is April 9. Chaitra Sukhladi is celebrated with much fervour and enthusiasm in Maharashtra and Karnataka. On this day, people wake up early and take a ritualistic bath. They then decorate their homes with rangolis and flowers. People also offer prayers to Lord Brahma and perform puja rituals. They wear new clothes and exchange sweets and gifts with family and friends.

In Maharashtra, people prepare a special dish called Shrikhand-Puri on this day. In Karnataka, people prepare a dish called Holige, which is made of jaggery and lentils. The festive spirit is high during Chaitra Sukhladi, and people come together to celebrate this day with great zeal.

Ramadan & Eid Cards30

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Ramadan & Eid Cards29

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Ramadan & Eid Cards28

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Laylat al-Qadr

In UNITY we believe that Sin is only an error in our thinking. The Night Power or Laylat al-Qadr is an opportunity to meditate, pray and affirm our connectedness with the Divine Source. Our ‘sins’ are forgiven because we surrender our will – eg. through fasting – and allow our consciousness to be lifted higher. 

Mohammad Prophet was a spiritual teacher similar to Jesus who brought forth spiritual laws (suggestions) for the seeker to attain a deeper relationship with the Divine. Mohammad suggests that after having practised abstinence for over 20 days during Ramadan, we now have arrived to The Night Power, that we can use for further stretching our limits. By using the night for meditation and prayer we can expect our reward in attaining a higher level of consciousness.

We must remember that attaining a higher level of conscious has physical implications as well. It is not only an inner experience though often it starts with that. As we lift our gaze or our consciousness higher, our physical experiences start reflecting our becoming more loving, accepting, kinder, embracing and more. It maybe difficult to imagine but as we become more vulnerable through being more in touch with the Divine, we generate and attract more ‘positive’ experiences for ourselves.

It is worth remembering that the spiritual path is not only an inner journey. As we evolve spiritually we also evolve in the physical. 

The Night Power

Laylat al-Qadr, Islamic festival that commemorates the night on which God first revealed the Qurʾān to the Prophet Muhammad through the angel Gabriel (Jibrīl). It is believed to have taken place on one of the final 10 nights of Ramadan in 610 ce, though the exact night is unclear.

Sunni Muslims believe that Laylat al-Qadr occurs among the odd-numbered nights of the last ten nights of Ramadan (21st, 23rd, 25th, 27th or 29th). Some scholars opine that if a Friday night occurs on an odd numbered night, the night is likely to be Laylat al-Qadr.

source: Britannica

The Night of Power (Arabic: لیلة القدر, romanized: Laylat al-Qadr; also rendered as the Night of Destiny, Night of Decree, Night of Determination, or the Precious Night), is, in Islamic belief, the night when Muslims believe the Quran was first sent down from heaven to the world and also the night when the first verses of the Quran were revealed to the Islamic prophet Muhammad

Muhammad would usually practice spiritual retreat (Iʿtikāf) during the last ten days of Ramadan, awaiting the Night of Power, fasting and praying throughout the night, and abstaining from sexual relations. He urged his followers to do the same. According to one hadith, Muhammad said: “Whoever stands [in prayer] during the Night of Power out of belief and seeking reward, his previous sins are forgiven.” (Sahih al-Bukhari 1901)

Source: WIkipedia

Ramadan & Eid Cards27

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Ramadan & Eid Cards26

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Ramadan & Eid Cards25

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Ramadan & Eid Cards24

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Ramadan & Eid Cards23

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

EASTER and PENTECOST

In Unity we always look for a deeper or a metaphysical meaning of events, texts, and celebrations.

When we look at Easter we see the upliftment of our consciousness to a higher level as a result of fasting or withdrawing from the worldly to the spiritual.

On Easter Monday, we celebrate a kind of renewal and a clearer and deeper understanding of our spiritual journey through release and forgiveness. We are joyful and merry. We feel lighter because we released faulty ideas, misconceptions of who we truly are and who God is for us. (read about how I see God here CLICK)

During the  days between today (Easter Monday) and Pentecost there will many spiritual observances from different traditions that we can use for our spiritual upliftment and growth. We can observe these  50 days by making the time to meditate or pray daily, focusing into the Divine Presence, reading uplifting spiritual material, and acting kindly towards ourselves and other.

Lets’ see if as a result of our efforts what happens on the day of Pentecost!

What is Pentecost and what does it have to do with Easter?

The name comes from the Greek word pentekoste which means fiftieth. Pentecost (also called Whit Sunday, Whitsunday or Whitsun) is a major festival in the Christian church, celebrated on the Sunday that falls on the 50th day of Easter. It commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit on the Apostles – while they were in Jerusalem celebrating the Feast of Weeks, as described in the Acts of the Apostles – and other disciples following the Crucifixion, Resurrection, and Ascension of Jesus Christ (Acts of the Apostles, chapter 2), and it marks the beginning of the Christian church’s mission to the world.

The events of Acts Chapter 2 are set against the backdrop of the celebration of Pentecost in Jerusalem. There are several major features to the Pentecost narrative presented in the second chapter of the Acts of the Apostles. The author begins by noting that the disciples of Jesus “were all together in one place” on the “day of Pentecost” (ἡμέρα τῆς Πεντηκοστῆς).[27] The verb used in Acts 2:1 to indicate the arrival of the day of Pentecost carries a connotation of fulfillment.

There is a “mighty rushing wind” (wind is a common symbol for the Holy Spirit) and “tongues as of fire” appear. The gathered disciples were “filled with the Holy Spirit, and began to speak in other tongues as the Spirit gave them utterance”. Some scholars have interpreted the passage as a reference to the multitude of languages spoken by the gathered disciples, while others have taken the reference to “tongues” (γλῶσσαι) to signify ecstatic speech.

Source Wikipedia and Britannica

Relationship with God

In Unity we do not suggest an understanding of God. We strive to support everyone to seek out their personal meaning of God and to create a personal relationship with the Divine that serve their upliftment and growth.

INTRODUCTION

They say that ‘all roads lead to Rome’. The same way, there are as many approaches to God as many people there are on the Earth. In my understanding, everyone is attempting to move back to Oneness with God or the Divine Presence that I call ’being in the Loving’ whether they know it or not.

In my observation, every person tries to create a relationship with whatever they believe God is depending on what they were taught and how they see themselves.

I learnt distinctively different ideas from different people. As a result, I first became an atheist and then as a result of that, I started to look for ‘my version of God’.

God is not a separate being, or an old guy looking down on us from Heaven judging our decisions in life. As a result of my journey ‘looking for God’, I realized that God is simply a loving being, an energy source that keeps on lifting us up and out of the drama and madness we, humanity, have been creating for ourselves through our collective thinking for ions of time.

In my experience, as we meditate or commune with this loving energy source we start peeking out of the fear-driven craze and start seeing the greatness and the goodness that is ‘beyond’.

DIFFERENT INFLUENCES

The Banned God

The utopistic socialist regime that I grew up in created a rather odd predicament with regards to God. Though religious acts were discouraged and if still practised punished with ostracism, churches were kept intact and Catholic religious holidays such as Easter and Christmas were held. We were nevertheless dissuaded to attend any of these events or suffer the consequences.

We, as children, were taught that there was no such God that the churches talked about – they were liars – and we should worship our political leaders – flesh and blood perfect specimen of a human being – especially the main leader of the socialistic party that we called ‘Big Brother’.

 

God as a Father Figure

My grandmother needed a father figure because she never had one.  What I gathered from observing her, her relationship with God was ambivalent. After having lost her second husband, she lost her relationship with God with him.

I think the Bible made her assume that God was a male character, and that he was like a good Father to all his children. Through her words, God was a loving father whom children can run to for shelter when hurt. He was protective and fair.

Because what my Grandmother communicated to me about the God she knew, when I first went to the church I went there to beg God to protect me from the abuse, I was experiencing at the time. I was looking for a father figure.

It was disappointing to learn that God does not show up in your school to tell the abusive teacher off. I understood there and then that God is not a substitute for an absent father.

 

God as a Prosecutor

My great-aunt, my grandmother’s cousin, was a bigot Catholic and was on a mission for a while to turn me into a Roman Catholic, except my grandma would not have it. She was a Calvinist.

My great aunt’s God was a Prosecutor.  We were to fear God who was always angry because we were misbehaving. God had a ‘whip’ called the Devil who, we were told, would come and take us to Hell if we were naughty.

My great aunt in her dread of her righteous God was a goodie-two-shoes who condemned everyone who did not believe or behaved as she thought was right. She wasn’t a nice person. Nevertheless, she believed that her God approved of her behaviour because she was doing the right thing.

In her relationship with God, she lived in fear of an entity that would punish her if she wasn’t a good girl. She was convinced that she was one of God’s messengers whose job was to ensure that others also follow God’s orders and were on the right path. As a psychologist it was her mission to bring all lost souls that landed on her ‘couch’ to the God of the Roman Catholic Church. She was in some ways a prosecutor herself because she believed that those who did not see things the same way she did were all sinners. She taught me that we should be grateful for our suffering because in our suffering we are closer to God.

My great aunt’s idea of God made me scared of God and wanted nothing to do with a vengeful God.

 

The Buddhist no-God

There was a moment when I thought that I had enough of the confusion around God and looked for a path with no God. Though Buddhists have many deities they do not actually have a God concept. Buddhists strive to attain Nirvana, which is a level of consciousness, total freedom of desire but it is not an alternative to God.

At first, I was relieved that I did not deal with others’ idea of God, anymore. I loved the meditation sessions on ‘nothing’, the focus on striving for ‘thoughtlessness’. I found a sense of freedom in that.

Soon, however, as I progressed in my meditation, I started to face a sense of ‘lack’.  I felt a sense of being and connectedness in my meditation but I could not place the sensation anywhere.

In a way, the Buddhist no-God-ness helped me to look for and find ‘my God’ and create the kind of relationship I wanted with God.

 

The Sufi God of Fire

After my Buddhist adventure, a friend who in my experience had a deep and personal relationship with God, introduced me to Sufism. I started to read poems by Rumi, learnt about Shams de Tabrizi, Rumi’s teacher. Then I ran into a book called ‘Love is a Fire’. The writer of this book talked about a kind of meditation that I had never heard of before: looking for fire and passion in meditation. She talked about an intimate and personal relationships with God that was new to me. So far, I had only met people who had a concept of God rather than an experience. As I was reading the book and practising the Sufi type of meditation, I started to feel a movement of ‘unexplainable’ energy that was strong and lively, with a burning sensation as it showed up within my consciousness.

I loved it! The first time God was not someone else’s concept but my own experience.

 

MY KIND OF GOD

I prefer calling God ‘Divine Presence’ or ‘the Source’ because the word ‘God’ is corrupted by different religious ideas that I cannot relate to.

 

God as Loving

This experience I mentioned above and that I still have today, is passionate and fiery. I understood later that my ‘burning like’ sensation in meditation was not the result of reading the book but because of the essence of who I am. I am fiery and passionate.

 

My relationship with God

And so is my relationship with God. I talk to the Divine Presence, but I still do not see God as a person. For me God is an energy field of pure Loving that is alive and is in constant movement.

As I step into this field, into Oneness, and connect with this Divine Presence, my Essence gets energized which becomes the foundation for my connection with God.

God is a vibrant presence in my Life, not only in my meditations but in my day-to-day living. I sense God all the time.

Interestingly I do experience the Divine Presence as the ‘Father’ and also as the ‘Prosecutor’ but very differently from that of my family members. God as ‘a Father’ to me means that God cares about me, I am important, if I listen, I can hear ‘him’ guiding me through the wilderness of life. God is also ‘a prosecutor’ means that I am held responsible for my experiences through my free will. My thinking, my emotions and my actions create my reality. If I want to have different experiences in life, it is not the Divine who would bring it forth, I am to think, feel, and act differently. How to bring that change about is a whole other story.  God in his Goodness, however, wants me to learn my lessons and free myself from my limitations. I call it ‘tough love’.

Most of all, however, my relationship with God is like the relationship between a sport team/person and its cheering squad. God is always on my side cheering me on! Similarly to Rumi, in my inner experiences, God sometimes shows up like a goof-ball dancing and singing to make sure I don’t lose faith when time gets rough. Our relationship is constantly evolving as I am evolving, opening, and becoming into my True Being.

In Unity we do not suggest an understanding of God. We strive to support everyone to seek out their personal meaning of God and to create a personal relationship with the Divine that serve their upliftment and growth.

Ramadan & Eid Cards22

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

Easter Message, a video

This is the video recording of the Spiritual Communion Service we held at Unity Daily Word UK. Rev Kabelo Letebele from Unity Johannesburg, South Africa, started the service whereas Rev Kimerie Mapletoft, Director of Silent Unity, UK introduced the program. Main speaker: Rev Ildiko Kudlik, UNITY EUROPE

(Please note that some of the songs are not shown in the program because of YouTube Copyright laws. Pls find the entire program and the songs below. )

 

EASTER SERVICE

Candle Lighting

I would like to ask you to light a candle or switch on a Candle App on your phone. As we light this candle, we remember that we have a light just like this within us. It is the unique essence of who we are. As we light the candle, we connect with this deeper part of ourselves and connect with the Divine Presence.

This song is to remind us of our loving relationship with the Divine/God.

 

The Lenten Journey

The Lenten Season is a 40-day journey of release and purification. We are getting ready to embrace a higher level of consciousness.

I walk the Lenten journey yearly now. Every year I am offered a different ‘main theme’ to work on. This year, my main learning seems to be ‘going with the flow’. I am leaning to release struggle and embrace neutrality and total acceptance of what is.

It is especially challenging for me because I am a ‘controller’. I want things the way I want them. My ideas are often flawed and limited. My life is way greater than what I can comprehend and therefore I don’t really know what’s best for me. I know what I want, and I struggle to get it because I often move ‘against’ the flow of Life. All my struggles would cease if I could just let it all go and move into Divine Order. (which is not a pre-destined fate or apathy!)

Silence and Contemplation

I would like to invite you to listen to this short mediation and contemplate on your own personal Lenten Journey: What was it like?  What have you discovered? What have you become aware of? What are the major ‘let go’s’ this year?

After listening to the meditation stay in the Silence for a while.

Forgiveness

Often as a result of looking at our shortcomings, we find ourselves wanting and so we judge ourselves. We think: “I shouldn’t have …”

I would like to invite you to remember or to read the part of the Bible that depicts the Crucifixion story in the the New Testament.

The Crucifixion of Jesus

26 As the soldiers led him away, they seized Simon from Cyrene, who was on his way in from the country, and put the cross on him and made him carry it behind Jesus. 27 A large number of people followed him, including women who mourned and wailed for him. 28 Jesus turned and said to them, “Daughters of Jerusalem, do not weep for me; weep for yourselves and for your children. 29 For the time will come when you will say, ‘Blessed are the childless women, the wombs that never bore and the breasts that never nursed!’ 30 Then

“‘they will say to the mountains, “Fall on us!”
    and to the hills, “Cover us!”’[b]

31 For if people do these things when the tree is green, what will happen when it is dry?”

32 Two other men, both criminals, were also led out with him to be executed. 33 When they came to the place called the Skull, they crucified him there, along with the criminals—one on his right, the other on his left. 34 Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they are doing.”[c] And they divided up his clothes by casting lots.

35 The people stood watching, and the rulers even sneered at him. They said, “He saved others; let him save himself if he is God’s Messiah, the Chosen One.”

36 The soldiers also came up and mocked him. They offered him wine vinegar 37 and said, “If you are the king of the Jews, save yourself.”

38 There was a written notice above him, which read: this is the king of the jews.

39 One of the criminals who hung there hurled insults at him: “Aren’t you the Messiah? Save yourself and us!”

40 But the other criminal rebuked him. “Don’t you fear God,” he said, “since you are under the same sentence? 41 We are punished justly, for we are getting what our deeds deserve. But this man has done nothing wrong.”

42 Then he said, “Jesus, remember me when you come into your kingdom.[d]” (NIV Luke 23:26-43)

Jesus answered him, “Truly I tell you, today you will be with me in paradise.” Luke 23:43

This sentence to me is a sign of total acceptance of what is and forgiveness.

Silence and Forgiveness

Now, I would like to invite you to listen to this short meditation on Luke 23:43

After you listened to the meditation you may want to stay in the silence and remember the different things you judge yourself for, then just say:

I forgive myself for judging myself for …

Resurrection

What do you think the resurrection story about?

Can you imagine that Jesus’  resurrection story is something that happens inside of us? Jesus’s story can be understood as the story of our own consciousness. As a result of having walked the Lenten Journey, having forgiven our ‘sins’ (by sin we understand our shortcomings and error thinking)  we find ourselves on a higher altitude, on a higher level of consciousness, and in greater Oneness with the Divine Presence as well as in greater Loving within ourselves.

Song and Silence

I would like to invite you to experience ‘this higher altitude’ by listening to this song.

As we listen to the next song, I would like to invite you to close your eyes and experience being lifted …

After the song, stay in the Silence for a while. 

 

Thank you listening and spending this time with me. I hope you found the meditations and songs uplifting. I wish you a blessed Easter Holiday.

 

40 Days of Love – Day40+7

40 Days of Letting Go, Letting God

From Release to Embrace

Rules 

At the link below, you can find the audio recording of all the Rules. You can randomly choose one and contemplate on it. It may bring you some insight or something to let go of today.

*

ESTER SUNDAY, the Holy Week

Today, we are releasing any attachment to our physical life and embracing God’s Love for us.

Today, as we release the ultimate attachment which is to our physical life, we remember that our souls continue their spiritual journey aft er death but that our
human lives are on an upward trajectory while we are here.

Today we celebrate all that the Easter story means to us. In  resurrection we realize that we have risen to a new level of consciousness on our journey of enlightenment.

HAPPY EASTER EVERYONE!

Today we affirm: Today I let go of all attachments and arrive to a higher plain.

Note : My writing is based on the book “40 Rules of Love” by by Elif Shafak (See more about the book here (click)  ( and The Lent booklet by Unity.org 

 

Holy Week or Passion Week   

Holy Week in the Christian year is the week immediately before Easter.

Holy Week begins with the commemoration of Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, marks the betrayal of Jesus on Spy Wednesday (Holy Wednesday), climaxing with the commemoration of the Mystical or Last Supper on Maundy Thursday and the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Holy Week concludes with Christ’s rest in death and descent into hell on Holy Saturday.

Christians believe that Jesus rested in death from the ninth hour (3 pm) on Good Friday until just before dawn on Sunday morning, the day of his resurrection from death, commonly known as Easter Sunday.

Holy Week liturgies generally attract the largest crowds of the year. Many Christian cultures have different traditions such as special liturgies or services, floats, sculptures or live reenactments of Christ’s life, his arrest and crucifixion (also called the Lord’s passion, the Passion of Christ or Passion of Jesus)

Looking at the ‘story’ above, what do you think this week could be about in terms of ‘Lifting one’s consciousness?’

Personally, I think it is important to find the True meaning behind the word ‘LOVE’,  understand it and experience it as a Spiritual Quality inherently within us. 

I am going to walk this 40-day Lenten journey contemplating on the True meaning of Love, Divine Love, Spiritual Love for me by experimenting with the 40 rules and quotes from the Lent Booklet. Every day, between 

the 14th of February and the 28th of March 2024,

I will post a ‘rule’ from the book ’40 rules of Love’ and an a release idea from the book ’40 days of Let go, Let God – Lent 2024′ by Unity.org. Then, we will contemplate on it and share about it in the UNITY EUROPE Facebook Group (CLICK HERE).

Download the LENT BOOKLET @this link 2024 Lent English 

Let’s walk this journey together!

Join me by …

either reading the daily blogposts I create – SEE THEM HERE (CLICK) – or joining the FACEBOOK GROUP (CLICK) where I am going to share my writings and daily contemplative questions. I will also post a short video/audio material on the daily posts. (click on the buttons below to join)

Ramadan & Eid Cards21

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

40 Days of Love – Day40+6

40 Days of Letting Go, Letting God

From Release to Embrace

Rules 

At the link below, you can find the audio recording of all the Rules. You can randomly choose one and contemplate on it. It may bring you some insight or something to let go of today.

*

Today, we are releasing fear of change and embracing God’s Love for us.

Today, our LENT booklet invites us to release release fear of change by embracing the idea that change is inevitable.

“The first step is to get in tune with the Infinite,” Eric Butterworth wrote in his essay “How to Overcome Fear and Worry.” We can take a gentle, cleansing breath to get in touch with the indwelling presence of God. As we do this, we release fear and embrace change wholeheartedly.

Do not fear, for I am with you, do not be afraid, for I am your God; I will strengthen you, I will help you, I will uphold you with my victorious right hand. Isaiah 41:10

Today we affirm: I am willing to release all limiting thoughts
and know change as my divine birthright

Note : My writing is based on the book “40 Rules of Love” by by Elif Shafak (See more about the book here (click)  ( and The Lent booklet by Unity.org 

 

Holy Week or Passion Week   

Holy Week in the Christian year is the week immediately before Easter.

Holy Week begins with the commemoration of Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, marks the betrayal of Jesus on Spy Wednesday (Holy Wednesday), climaxing with the commemoration of the Mystical or Last Supper on Maundy Thursday and the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Holy Week concludes with Christ’s rest in death and descent into hell on Holy Saturday.

Christians believe that Jesus rested in death from the ninth hour (3 pm) on Good Friday until just before dawn on Sunday morning, the day of his resurrection from death, commonly known as Easter Sunday.

Holy Week liturgies generally attract the largest crowds of the year. Many Christian cultures have different traditions such as special liturgies or services, floats, sculptures or live reenactments of Christ’s life, his arrest and crucifixion (also called the Lord’s passion, the Passion of Christ or Passion of Jesus)

Looking at the ‘story’ above, what do you think this week could be about in terms of ‘Lifting one’s consciousness?’

Personally, I think it is important to find the True meaning behind the word ‘LOVE’,  understand it and experience it as a Spiritual Quality inherently within us. 

I am going to walk this 40-day Lenten journey contemplating on the True meaning of Love, Divine Love, Spiritual Love for me by experimenting with the 40 rules and quotes from the Lent Booklet. Every day, between 

the 14th of February and the 28th of March 2024,

I will post a ‘rule’ from the book ’40 rules of Love’ and an a release idea from the book ’40 days of Let go, Let God – Lent 2024′ by Unity.org. Then, we will contemplate on it and share about it in the UNITY EUROPE Facebook Group (CLICK HERE).

Download the LENT BOOKLET @this link 2024 Lent English 

Let’s walk this journey together!

Join me by …

either reading the daily blogposts I create – SEE THEM HERE (CLICK) – or joining the FACEBOOK GROUP (CLICK) where I am going to share my writings and daily contemplative questions. I will also post a short video/audio material on the daily posts. (click on the buttons below to join)

Grumbling vs. Gratitude 

I have a confession to make. Sometimes I grumble. Sometimes I’m irritated by having to wait in long lines or by the driving habits of others…and I grumble about it. Sometimes I’m less than pleased by getting the flu or having the aches and pains that come with an aging body…and I grumble about that. Sometimes I’m impatient with bureaucracy and paperwork and glitching websites and endless waits on hold, trying to reach an actual person to talk to…and I grumble about it. And sometimes I just grumble about life not being exactly the way I want it to be. 

C.S. Lewis wrote, Hell begins with a grumbling mood, always complaining…but “you” are still distinct from it. But there may come a day when you can no longer stop. Then there will be no “you” left to criticize the mood or even to enjoy it, but just the grumble itself, going on forever like a machine. 

We all know people like this: people who have a sour outlook on life and communicate that dissatisfaction in each and every encounter they have with others. How much do you enjoy being around that type of person? Probably not much.

So, how can I make sure that my occasional grumble about something specific doesn’t become all there is of me? I have a secret weapon: gratitude. Gratitude is the opposite of grumbling. It’s paying more attention to what we have than what we don’t. It is the appreciation of what we have while we have it. It’s remembering who we are, the souls we love, and all the other blessings we have in our lives. Gratitude is what brings joy and contentment into our lives, and helps us grasp the deeper meaning in all that we experience: love.

In my family and social circle and spiritual community, I know people who cannot see, who cannot walk, who live in poverty, who have lost a spouse, who have serious medical conditions, who have faced financial ruin, and in general have circumstances and conditions that anyone else would label as devastating – and yet they have risen above them. They talk with enthusiasm about how grateful they are, and instead of focusing on their afflictions; they ask how others are doing and radiate compassion and kindness toward them. And in every single case, they were able to do that because they practiced gratitude instead of grumbling.

So, today, this day, while we may experience some situations that are less than optimal, we can make them worse – by grumbling – or better, by practicing gratitude. I don’t know about you, but today? Today I’m choosing gratitude.

A moment of Grace by Rev Steven McAfee @ONEBYONE COMMUINTY

Re McAfee is a pastor at Unity Fort Wayne Spiritual Centre. See the March Program below 

Reach Rev McAfee for his programs at onebyonecommunity@gmail.com

Pic source UNSPLASH.COM

Ramadan & Eid Cards20

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

40 Days of Love – Day40+5

40 Days of Letting Go, Letting God

From Release to Embrace

Rules 

At the link below, you can find the audio recording of all the Rules. You can randomly choose one and contemplate on it. It may bring you some insight or something to let go of today.

*

Good Friday, the Holy Week

Today, we are releasing blame and embracing God’s Love for us.

Today, as we release blame we remember the words of ultimate forgiveness:

“Father, forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing.” Luke 23:34

Also, instead of reading clever words on how to release blame I would like you to image hearing these words inside of you:

forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing

Then move your attention to different events and people in you life so far who may have hurt you. When someone’s name appeared in your consciousness simple do as you are told:

forgive them; for they do not know what they are doing

(Please, remember, we are not forgiving the act but the error in their consciousness)

Then start remembering events where you were at fault, and people who have hurt. Once again do as you are told:

forgive them (him/her); for they (s/he) do not know what they (s/he) are doing

(Here we are forgiving our blame, our judgement against ourselves)

Today we affirm: Today I let go of blame and view every
experience in the light of understanding

Note : My writing is based on the book “40 Rules of Love” by by Elif Shafak (See more about the book here (click)  ( and The Lent booklet by Unity.org 

 

Holy Week or Passion Week   

Holy Week in the Christian year is the week immediately before Easter.

Holy Week begins with the commemoration of Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, marks the betrayal of Jesus on Spy Wednesday (Holy Wednesday), climaxing with the commemoration of the Mystical or Last Supper on Maundy Thursday and the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Holy Week concludes with Christ’s rest in death and descent into hell on Holy Saturday.

Christians believe that Jesus rested in death from the ninth hour (3 pm) on Good Friday until just before dawn on Sunday morning, the day of his resurrection from death, commonly known as Easter Sunday.

Holy Week liturgies generally attract the largest crowds of the year. Many Christian cultures have different traditions such as special liturgies or services, floats, sculptures or live reenactments of Christ’s life, his arrest and crucifixion (also called the Lord’s passion, the Passion of Christ or Passion of Jesus)

Looking at the ‘story’ above, what do you think this week could be about in terms of ‘Lifting one’s consciousness?’

Personally, I think it is important to find the True meaning behind the word ‘LOVE’,  understand it and experience it as a Spiritual Quality inherently within us. 

I am going to walk this 40-day Lenten journey contemplating on the True meaning of Love, Divine Love, Spiritual Love for me by experimenting with the 40 rules and quotes from the Lent Booklet. Every day, between 

the 14th of February and the 28th of March 2024,

I will post a ‘rule’ from the book ’40 rules of Love’ and an a release idea from the book ’40 days of Let go, Let God – Lent 2024′ by Unity.org. Then, we will contemplate on it and share about it in the UNITY EUROPE Facebook Group (CLICK HERE).

Download the LENT BOOKLET @this link 2024 Lent English 

Let’s walk this journey together!

Join me by …

either reading the daily blogposts I create – SEE THEM HERE (CLICK) – or joining the FACEBOOK GROUP (CLICK) where I am going to share my writings and daily contemplative questions. I will also post a short video/audio material on the daily posts. (click on the buttons below to join)

Ramadan & Eid Cards19

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

40 Days of Love – Day40+4

40 Days of Letting Go, Letting God

From Release to Embrace

Rules 

At the link below, you can find the audio recording of all the Rules. You can randomly choose one and contemplate on it. It may bring you some insight or something to let go of today.

*

Maundy Thursday, the Holy Week

Today, we are releasing anger and embracing God’s Love for us.

Our Lent Booklet invites us today to release anger because it can can consume us, and yet to let it go we must willingly acknowledge its presence. If we attempt to bypass that step on the journey, we allow anger to color our perception of every
area of life. 

Today is Maundy Thursday, a day when we remember the Last Supper. Jesus was a man who could get angry when he wanted to make a point, but not that evening. He humbly washed the feet of his disciples, even Judas. 

I love the story of the feet washing. I cannot imagine a more humble act of loving.

 

12 When he had finished washing their feet, he put on his clothes and returned to his place. “Do you understand what I have done for you?” he asked them. 13 “You call me ‘Teacher’ and ‘Lord,’ and rightly so, for that is what I am. 14 Now that I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also should wash one another’s feet. 15 I have set you an example that you should do as I have done for you. 16 Very truly I tell you, no servant is greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him. 17 Now that you know these things, you will be blessed if you do them. NIV John 13:1-17

Today we affirm: My actions and thoughts are fueled by love

Note : My writing is based on the book “40 Rules of Love” by by Elif Shafak (See more about the book here (click)  ( and The Lent booklet by Unity.org 

 

Holy Week or Passion Week   

Holy Week in the Christian year is the week immediately before Easter.

Holy Week begins with the commemoration of Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, marks the betrayal of Jesus on Spy Wednesday (Holy Wednesday), climaxing with the commemoration of the Mystical or Last Supper on Maundy Thursday and the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Holy Week concludes with Christ’s rest in death and descent into hell on Holy Saturday.

Christians believe that Jesus rested in death from the ninth hour (3 pm) on Good Friday until just before dawn on Sunday morning, the day of his resurrection from death, commonly known as Easter Sunday.

Holy Week liturgies generally attract the largest crowds of the year. Many Christian cultures have different traditions such as special liturgies or services, floats, sculptures or live reenactments of Christ’s life, his arrest and crucifixion (also called the Lord’s passion, the Passion of Christ or Passion of Jesus)

Looking at the ‘story’ above, what do you think this week could be about in terms of ‘Lifting one’s consciousness?’

Personally, I think it is important to find the True meaning behind the word ‘LOVE’,  understand it and experience it as a Spiritual Quality inherently within us. 

I am going to walk this 40-day Lenten journey contemplating on the True meaning of Love, Divine Love, Spiritual Love for me by experimenting with the 40 rules and quotes from the Lent Booklet. Every day, between 

the 14th of February and the 28th of March 2024,

I will post a ‘rule’ from the book ’40 rules of Love’ and an a release idea from the book ’40 days of Let go, Let God – Lent 2024′ by Unity.org. Then, we will contemplate on it and share about it in the UNITY EUROPE Facebook Group (CLICK HERE).

Download the LENT BOOKLET @this link 2024 Lent English 

Let’s walk this journey together!

Join me by …

either reading the daily blogposts I create – SEE THEM HERE (CLICK) – or joining the FACEBOOK GROUP (CLICK) where I am going to share my writings and daily contemplative questions. I will also post a short video/audio material on the daily posts. (click on the buttons below to join)

Ramadan & Eid Cards18

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

40 Days of Love – Day40+3

40 Days of Letting Go, Letting God

From Release to Embrace

Rules 

At the link below, you can find the audio recording of all the Rules. You can randomly choose one and contemplate on it. It may bring you some insight or something to let go of today.

*

Today, we are releasing negative thinking and embracing God’s Love for us.

Our Lent Booklet invites us today to release negative thinking that is often brought on by the ‘negative news’ coming from the world. 

It is challenging not to get caught up in the craze of the world that lives on drama and negative thoughts. Troubling events in the world are a reality, yet instead of focusing on the negative, we can choose to turn our thoughts to the beauty and wonder that exist everywhere.

Pleasant words are like a honeycomb, sweetness to the soul and health to the body.—Proverbs 16:24

Today we affirm: I focus my thoughts on the goodness
and beauty in the world.

Note : My writing is based on the book “40 Rules of Love” by by Elif Shafak (See more about the book here (click)  ( and The Lent booklet by Unity.org 

 

Holy Week or Passion Week   

Holy Week in the Christian year is the week immediately before Easter.

Holy Week begins with the commemoration of Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, marks the betrayal of Jesus on Spy Wednesday (Holy Wednesday), climaxing with the commemoration of the Mystical or Last Supper on Maundy Thursday and the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Holy Week concludes with Christ’s rest in death and descent into hell on Holy Saturday.

Christians believe that Jesus rested in death from the ninth hour (3 pm) on Good Friday until just before dawn on Sunday morning, the day of his resurrection from death, commonly known as Easter Sunday.

Holy Week liturgies generally attract the largest crowds of the year. Many Christian cultures have different traditions such as special liturgies or services, floats, sculptures or live reenactments of Christ’s life, his arrest and crucifixion (also called the Lord’s passion, the Passion of Christ or Passion of Jesus)

Looking at the ‘story’ above, what do you think this week could be about in terms of ‘Lifting one’s consciousness?’

Personally, I think it is important to find the True meaning behind the word ‘LOVE’,  understand it and experience it as a Spiritual Quality inherently within us. 

I am going to walk this 40-day Lenten journey contemplating on the True meaning of Love, Divine Love, Spiritual Love for me by experimenting with the 40 rules and quotes from the Lent Booklet. Every day, between 

the 14th of February and the 28th of March 2024,

I will post a ‘rule’ from the book ’40 rules of Love’ and an a release idea from the book ’40 days of Let go, Let God – Lent 2024′ by Unity.org. Then, we will contemplate on it and share about it in the UNITY EUROPE Facebook Group (CLICK HERE).

Download the LENT BOOKLET @this link 2024 Lent English 

Let’s walk this journey together!

Join me by …

either reading the daily blogposts I create – SEE THEM HERE (CLICK) – or joining the FACEBOOK GROUP (CLICK) where I am going to share my writings and daily contemplative questions. I will also post a short video/audio material on the daily posts. (click on the buttons below to join)

Ramadan & Eid Cards17

Every Road leads to God if it is a road of Love, Compassion and Charity. Each culture and faith has its own traditions and celebrations that were originally created so to enable the seekers to find their path to God. Ramadan is one of these traditions.

Ramadan

Ramadan begins on the night of Sunday, 10 March, and continue through Tuesday, April 9, ending in the celebratory Eid al-Fitr.

I found a few lovely tips that we could all follow to observe Ramadan. Following these simple tips can remind us of the core message of Ramadan (which is rather similar to Lent): It is a time for reflection, withdrawal from the world by not indulging in pleasures like eating, turning your attention within and celebrate your connection to the Divine Presence.

TODAY’S EID CARD

Come and join me by posting your EID CARD each day expressing in drawing and writing what you are most grateful for ‘today’ (each day) in our FACEBOOK GROUP

40 Days of Love – Day40+2

40 Days of Letting Go, Letting God

From Release to Embrace

Rules 

At the link below, you can find the audio recording of all the Rules. You can randomly choose one and contemplate on it. It may bring you some insight or something to let go of today.

*

Today, we are releasing drama and embracing God’s Love for us.

Our Lent Booklet invites us today to release drama that we often generate as a result of our unsettled mind. We can find that our thoughts that stem in fear end up in drama.

The more we align our hearts and minds with God, the more we are given clear direction. Fear and drama fade away. 

Breathing in slowly and mindfully, slowing to stillness, and filling ourselves up with gratitude pulls us away and frees us from inner and outer drama.

Today we affirm: I release drama and extend peace and love to all

Note : My writing is based on the book “40 Rules of Love” by by Elif Shafak (See more about the book here (click)  ( and The Lent booklet by Unity.org 

 

Holy Week or Passion Week

Holy Week in the Christian year is the week immediately before Easter.

Holy Week begins with the commemoration of Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem on Palm Sunday, marks the betrayal of Jesus on Spy Wednesday (Holy Wednesday), climaxing with the commemoration of the Mystical or Last Supper on Maundy Thursday and the Passion of Jesus on Good Friday. Holy Week concludes with Christ’s rest in death and descent into hell on Holy Saturday.

Christians believe that Jesus rested in death from the ninth hour (3 pm) on Good Friday until just before dawn on Sunday morning, the day of his resurrection from death, commonly known as Easter Sunday.

Holy Week liturgies generally attract the largest crowds of the year. Many Christian cultures have different traditions such as special liturgies or services, floats, sculptures or live reenactments of Christ’s life, his arrest and crucifixion (also called the Lord’s passion, the Passion of Christ or Passion of Jesus)

Looking at the ‘story’ above, what do you think this week could be about in terms of ‘Lifting one’s consciousness?’

Personally, I think it is important to find the True meaning behind the word ‘LOVE’,  understand it and experience it as a Spiritual Quality inherently within us. 

I am going to walk this 40-day Lenten journey contemplating on the True meaning of Love, Divine Love, Spiritual Love for me by experimenting with the 40 rules and quotes from the Lent Booklet. Every day, between 

the 14th of February and the 28th of March 2024,

I will post a ‘rule’ from the book ’40 rules of Love’ and an a release idea from the book ’40 days of Let go, Let God – Lent 2024′ by Unity.org. Then, we will contemplate on it and share about it in the UNITY EUROPE Facebook Group (CLICK HERE).

Download the LENT BOOKLET @this link 2024 Lent English 

Let’s walk this journey together!

Join me by …

either reading the daily blogposts I create – SEE THEM HERE (CLICK) – or joining the FACEBOOK GROUP (CLICK) where I am going to share my writings and daily contemplative questions. I will also post a short video/audio material on the daily posts. (click on the buttons below to join)

The greatest ‘let go’

When you let go of who you are, you become who you might be. Rumi

I have been contemplating on this a lot: What is the greatest ‘let go”? What is the hardest to release for us all? 

I came to the conclusion that it is our own self-image. We, all, are convinced that we are who we think we are. It is a mistake.

We build our image as a result of our upbringing, we build it in defence of what we perceived as threat. Our image is like a mask that covers up our true identity. 

So, why is it so hard to let it go? It is because we are afraid that if we release the mask, we become vulnerable. Plus, most of us believe that the mask is our true self.

How to do it then? The only way to give up the mask is to receive something in return, something greater than what the mask could provide. The mask provides false security. 

So what provides real security?

Nothing does.

However.

When we move into the silence and start aligning ourselves with the Divine Presence, we start releasing all that that stands between our individual Spark and God. The Mask is one of these hindrances. Like peeling an onion we release aspects of ourselves that do not serve us any more. In return we become aware of who we truly are in our Essence. And with that, we start feeling safe in ourselves and in the Arms of the Divine.

Everything I have written above comes from personal experience. I had to deal with a great amount of insecurity as a child. As a result, I created a mask, an alter-ego, who was always strong and capable, whom I could always rely on, who will keep me safe in a violent and cruel world, a fighter.

But the worrier does not give up its dominion very easily. It took me a considerable amount of time to release this false image and allow myself to live who I truly am: a goof-ball. 🙂